What are the native fruits of Canada

Where the complete strangers Berry to grow

Small, round and really cute: No, we're not talking about cute baby bears! Canada's forests are full of berries that are hardly known in this country. They are mega delicious and super healthy. A stop to try is always worthwhile - whether in the supermarket or while trekking through the woods. So pick yourselves healthy. Here are my top 6!

Chokecherries

No question about it, most people have a natural aversion to eating anything that has the name "choke" in it. And that's exactly why the chokecherries eke out a shadowy existence on the menus of international gastronomy. Completely wrong, because thanks to the high proportion of vitamin C and antioxidants, they are part of the so-called superfood. It is especially good as a syrup or jam Virginian bird cherry, as it is called in German, a culinary hit.

Where do you live? Especially in the Pacific Northwest region.

 

Aronia

The black chokeberryAs this fruit is also called, everyone is talking about it in North America and grows in the forests of Canada. Its taste is reminiscent of the blueberry. While the natives made tea from it, we enjoy it as fruit juice, liqueur, jam or jelly.

Where do you live? For example in New Brunswick, where the berry is traditionally processed into vinegar.

 

Cranberries

What would a turkey Thanksgiving dinner be without cranberry sauce? In most Canadian families, that is unthinkable. Probably the most famous berry in the country owes its name to the pilgrims who landed on the east coast of North America in 1620. Because the flowers of the plant move like the head of a crane in the wind, they named it "Crane Berry". The red vitamin bombs taste very bitter and sour on their own. Therefore, they are usually mixed with other fruits before they are processed into juice or jam. You can now find them fresh in our supermarkets. They are suitable, for example, for the prevention of urinary and bladder diseases.

Where do you live? The cranberry can be found in Ontario in particular.

 

Salal berries

Salal berries are so common in Canada that most people simply overlook them. They are there with theirs Vitamin richness a guarantee for a long and healthy life. The small power packs are a hit when dried - because they are so easy to transport and taste delicious like raisins. The First Nations have incorporated these berries into their diet for centuries.

Where do you live? Especially in the Pacific Northwest region.

 

Saskatoon berry

Need some refreshment? With its rich calcium and iron content, the Saskatoon berry is a real power plant! The Native Americans already knew this - and enjoyed snacking on their own or mixed with other ingredients. No wonder, resembles her Taste that of the forest blueberries, with a hint of almond and cherry aroma. You like to access it twice.

Where do you live? As the name suggests, the berry is particularly found around the Saskatchewan River.

 

Canadian Buffalo Berry

Whether as a frothy dessert, as a natural soap or as a remedy for swelling: the buffalo berries came from the native inhabitants of Canada - by the way an optical twin of our currant and the favorite food of grizzly bears - used as an all-rounder. Today it is celebrated by nutritionists for its high protein and lycopine content.

Where do you live? The berry is also found north of the Arctic Circle. It can be found particularly well in Newfoundland on a hike.